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Pazzo Levers: A Must-Have

Pazzo Levers: A Must-Have - SoloMotoParts.com -- Motorcycle hand levers are one of the most important accessories for a bike owner. And yet, how many of us actually make it a point to properly "fit" the controls?  

There are a lot of distractions that can occur on the road and poor motorcycle levers shouldn't be one of them. Too long or too short or too far or too close can all be disastrous when it comes to your hand controls and levers. 

We've all been in close call situations. Just mere seconds can mean the difference between accident or escape, and it's not safe to be fumbling with your hand controls in such a pressure situation. A good set of brakes and clutch levers can really make all the difference in your riding experience. 

Our personal pick for hand levers are, hands-down, Pazzo Levers

Pazzo Racing Levers, officially, are the result of 25 years of machining experience and expertise. Check out what makes Pazzo Levers a must-have accessory: 

Nearly indestructible material 

Pazzo levers are made from CNC machining using a 6061-T6 billet aluminum to precise tolerances. This is the leading material of choice for many street riders and professional racers alike. 

But what exactly is 6061-T6 Billet Aluminum? I went an asked my brother, the mechanical engineer, for clarification. 

In simple terms, it's a very high quality, aircraft grade aluminum that is difficult to flex or break and is among the strongest aluminum alloys available. Perfect! This is exactly what I would want for such an important part of my bike! 

Adjustable and fully customizable lengths 

In their most basic form, Pazzo levers allow you to adjust how close or far the lever is from the grip. Trust me, this is a godsend for riders with smaller or larger-than-average hands. 

Additionally, the length of the lever blade itself can be purchased in either short (shorty) or standard (long). The shorty can be considered a 2 or 3 finger lever and is most often used for the brake. For reference, it's about 1-1/4 inches shorter than the OE lever. 

Sets can also be purchased with varying lever lengths and combinations depending on what you need. For example, you can get "long clutch and short brake" for the same cost as "long clutch and long brake" or "short clutch and short brake". The goal here is to feel comfortable with your controls and have a setup you love.

New Pazzo folding levers

Aside from the standard configuration on long or short, Pazzo Levers also recently added folding levers to their product line. These provide a dual pivot folding action which helps prevent breakage in the event of a tip-over or low side. The levers will fold out of the way to help prevent the levers from breaking on impact. 

This is a great concept for road racers as broken levers can easily cause your race to end. New riders will appreciate them as well because unintentional tip-overs do happen (yes, I've been there). 

What's more, is that installation isn't rocket science and can be done relatively quickly for most models. However, we do recommend a professional mechanic if you're unsure.

Crazy cool color options 

Besides the technical aspects, the coolest feature may be that the Pazzo levers come in a variety of anodized colors. You can mix and match lever blade colors with different color adjusters so you can achieve nearly endless customization. (I myself love how black levers look on a modern sportbike.)

For those who like more color, you can select from a wide variety including red, blue, gold, and silver, just to name a few. It's incredible the combinations of colors available and I bet you'll take the longest time deciding what colors you want. Even if you're bored of standard anodized colors, IFX Candy and powered coated colors add an entirely new color dimension.

With these mind-boggling combination of custom options and features, Pazzo Lever are our top pick for hand lever upgrades to your motorbike.  

You can order very attractive and functional Pazzo Racing Levers here:

By Daniel Relich

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